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MYTHIC GREECE FOR MERP:

Supplement: Fabled Monsters of Mythic Greece

By Daniel M. Myers, 2000

Edited by Lowell R. Matthews for The Guild Companion

Editor's note: This article is a supplement to the article "Mythic Greece for MERP" and its addendum on the Trojans, which appeared in the May 1999 and December 1999 issues of The Guild Companion, respectively, and is the companion to the article "Natural Fauna of Mythic Greece" which appeared in the March 2000 issue.

1.0 Introduction

The fabled monsters of Mythic Greece are unique. While the hero may know what kind of beast he is facing, and its name, he may well have no real idea of what it can do. Who knows what that goofy satyr harassing him could be? It could be just a drunken, happy-go-lucky satyr, or the god Pan, or a bored magic-user!

In Mythic Greece, fabled monsters are most frequently larger-than-normal beasts suffering from some sort of gigantism, usually as the result of divine meddling (including parentage). Another type of fabled monster is the combination of two or more animals rolled into one terrible monster (i.e., a classic Rolemaster Composite Monster). The minotaur is an excellent example of such a Composite Monster; it has the body of a fabulously muscled ("ripped") man and the head of a bull (that is, were natural bulls to become carnivorous). A minotaur, especially the Minotaur of Crete, is a terrible encounter for any brave hero.

The most confusing aspect of the fabled monsters of Mythic Greece is the variety of powers monsters of a particular type can have. For example, a particular cyclops might have six arms instead of the conventional two. A centaur might be a powerful spell-user; a giant bull could be a god in disguise. Greek myths are widely strewn with all sorts of examples of these phenomena. Therefore, in the spirit of those myths, the GM should feel free to give fabled monsters extra powers (or liabilities) or to create slightly different versions of each fabled monster archetype to keep heroes on their toes.

2.0 Giant and Enhanced Beasts

2.1 Boar, Great (Giant Beast)

These beasts are typically sent by an offended god or goddess to punish a king or queen for (perceived) insults. They are much larger than normal boars and have hides thick enough to withstand arrows.

2.2 Bull, Giant (Giant Beast or Supernatural Entity)

These huge bulls are the sort usually kept by the gods and into which gods often change shape. Magnificent in appearance and awesome in strength, these bulls are much larger and more alluring than any normal bull. Gods of earth and fertility often send them to heroes or kings as gifts—or punishment.

2.3 Dolphin, Great (Enhanced Beast)

To the naked eye (or the ignorant observer), a great dolphin is nothing more than a large dolphin. In actuality, great dolphins are very intelligent and have the power of human speech. They are said to possess great wisdom of the sea. Great dolphins are known for their compassion towards humankind. Sailors' tales tell of dolphins (i.e. great dolphins) rescuing sailors from drowning and carrying them on their fins to land. Legends say that if a sailor in extreme need cries out "Simo!" (Greek for "snub-nosed") then a dolphin (i.e. great dolphin) will come to his aid. Great dolphins are often seen playing with the Nereids and other sea-gods. They often act as messengers between the Nereids and other inhabitants of the sea.

2.4 Horse, Great, or Horse of Poseidon (Enhanced Beast)

Poseidon created these magical steeds long ago. They are known for their beauty, nearly human intelligence, speed, and strength. No one type of great horse exists because their abilities vary individually; the GM must determine the individual traits of each. Most can run across bodies of water or rough terrain with no difficulty, even during full sprint (gallop). On rare occasions, a great horse can talk or be immortal.

2.5 Lion, Great (Giant Beast)

These lions are much larger, meaner, and stronger than any normal lion. Their night vision and sense of smell is superb. Their invulnerable skin is tough enough to repel arrows; it acts as chain armor and makes great lions immune to heat- and cold-based attacks. Rare individuals like the Nemean Lion have skin as tough as plate armor! Fortunately, great lions are solitary creatures except during mating season where two or more can be found together. Typically, they live in caves.

2.6 Scorpion, Giant (Giant Beast)

These belong to the class of monsters that the gods typically send to harass heroes. Giant scorpion stingers produce a level-4 nerve poison.

2.7 Vulture, Giant (Giant Beast)

These creatures are large enough to carry off an adult human. Some have proven to be cunning while hunting. They tend to serve persons of ill repute.

3.0 Fell Creatures

3.1 Hydra (Fell Creature)

Hydrae are great bulky serpents with three or more heads and usually short legs to support their bodies. They usually inhabit swampy or moist areas. Hydrae have several special characteristics that make them fearsome monsters. One such characteristic is their venom, which is typically a lethal level 10 poison; RR failures of –50 or more result in instant death. A second noted characteristic is the ability of hydrae to attack numerous targets. Up to four heads may concentrate on a single target; each head receives +10 OB for each additional attack.

A third characteristic is the ability of hydrae to regenerate lost heads. Typically, hidden among the mortal "auxiliary" heads is one "immortal" "prime" head that supports the rest of the heads and the body. It cannot be stunned and ignores all bleeding results. Destroying the prime head will cause the hydra to perish, but the other heads are able to regenerate once dead or severed. Some hydrae can regenerate two more heads (in 2–20 rounds) in place of one slain head. Only if the neck wound is cauterized will regeneration stop. Destroying the body will also slay the hydra. Each auxiliary head has 35 hits, the prime head has 65 hits, and the body has 170 hits. (The hit total shown on the table below represents the body and does not include the heads.)

3.2 Serpent, Great (Fell Creature)

The dragon-kin of Mythic Greece are usually called "great serpents." Typically, great serpents have neither legs nor wings; most are large, bulky serpents. Most have venom; a few can breathe fire (or another Element). Their personalities range from peaceful to sinister. Some great serpents in favor with the gods can have wings and the power of speech. If a hero dispatches a great serpent in favor with a god, it could result in that god becoming the hero's Hunter. Due to the great serpents' size, all of their extremities can attack more than one target, though each attack beyond the first takes –15 OB per additional attack. Any two adjacent extremities can attack one target. A great serpent can attack with each leg or arm, then with its mouth, tail, or body. Those great serpents without limbs can constrict several man-sized foes at once in an attempt to crush them. A great serpent's potent venom is usually its greatest asset; these usually act as level 10 poisons, injected whenever a critical is scored with the mouth (or sometimes claws or stingers). Those few great serpents that can breathe an Element can spit bolts of that Element (+60 OB, range 200').

4.0 Composite Monsters

4.1 Cerberus (Composite Monster or Supernatural Entity)

The Cerberus, the archetype, is the beloved immortal dog of Hades who guards the gates to the City of Erebus in the Underworld; the lesser creatures of the same name may in fact be offspring of the archetype. Cerberi appear as a very large, black, three-headed dogs with glaring red eyes. The Cerberus is immortal; wounds that would normally result in death instead cause him to fall unconscious. (Lesser cerberi are, however, usually mortal.) Cerberi attack with all three heads; their bites inject a poison (typically level 3) whenever any critical is scored. Should a cerberus concentrate its attacks on one target, it receives +10 to OB for each attack forfeited. The Cerberus will let any mortal into Erebus (the Underworld), but will refuse them exit. Legends say there are ways to convince Cerberus to let a hero out of the Underworld. One way is supposed to be giving Cerberus a treat of honey-cake, which always seems to put him to sleep.

4.2 Chimera (Composite Monster)

One of the most bizarre monsters in Mythic Greece, the chimera is a combination of several creatures rolled into one. The archetypal Chimera has the body and head of a great lion, but from the middle of its torso a goat’s head protrudes outwards, and the tail, neck, and head of a small dragon protrude from its rear. (Other chimerae might have different animal parts or locations of attachment to the main body.) Despite its bizarre appearance, the chimera is quite swift; flanking or ambushing the monster is virtually impossible. All of its weapons (heads, limbs, and tail) can attack different targets. If it chooses to concentrate attacks on one target, then the creature becomes even more formidable, for each attack receives an additional +20 to OB for each attack forfeited. Each creature part contributes to the individual monster’s special abilities. For example, the archetype's dragon-head can spit Firebolts (+60 OB, 100' range) and it confers heat resistance to the entire creature (damage from all heat-based attacks is halved). Its lion components give it strength and highly acute senses of smell and night-sight, while its goat-head makes the whole immune to poisons. Fortunately for heroes, chimerae tend to be solitary creatures living in hilly terrain or volcanoes with hot, dry climates. Once settled in a lair, they immediately go about wasting the surrounding area, and they leave behind a distinctly foul stench of death in the area.

4.3 Gorgon (Composite Monster or Supernatural Entity)

The three archetypal Gorgons were once beautiful women, priestesses of Aphrodite, before their jealous goddess transformed them into hideous monsters. Most gorgons appear as grotesque women with snakes in place of hair and serpentine invulnerable skin that acts as plate armor and renders them immune to heat- and cold-based attacks. Most gorgons have wings and can fly. Though not necessarily evil by nature, they do enjoy turning humans to stone. Their hideous appearance alone causes those viewing them to turn to stone. Anyone caught viewing a gorgon must resist a level 13 magical attack or be turned to stone for an indefinite period (perhaps centuries). Any hero lucky enough to dispatch a gorgon should be careful with the blood; a gorgon blood is magical and highly poisonous.

4.4 Minotaur (Composite Monster)

With the head of a large bull and the body of a powerful man, the minotaur combines the savageness of a bull and the cunning of a man. These monsters feed on anything and anyone, and are always on the hunt for food. They are most often found in tunnels, mazes, or sylvan mazes. With their glowing red eyes, they are able to see at night, even in absolute darkness to 5' as if it were day. Furthermore, minotaurs have an innate ability to perceive all sapient beings within 75', which aids them in searching for heroes lost in their mazes.

5.0 Artificial Entities

5.1 Bull, Brazen (Artificial Entity)

Created long ago by Hephaestus the smith-god (later known to the Romans as Vulcan) as gifts for kings and heroes, brazen bulls appear to be large, fire-breathing bulls with a metallic bronze hide and hooves. Their hide protects as chain mail armor. Their eyes glow red and their nostrils flare fire. They radiate so much heat that all creatures (with the possible exception of their lawful owners) within 10 feet take an "A" heat critical. They can also spit +30 Firebolts with a range of 30 feet.

5.2 Man, Bronze (Artificial Entity)

Another fabled monster created by Hephaestus long ago, bronze men appear as large, living bronze statues of grinning muscular men. Hephaestus uses them in a variety of ways to act as guardians of kingdoms he favors, or to harass heroes who have offended him, or on hunts, or even to help him in his smithy. As they are made of solid bronze, all criticals against them are reduced by one level. They also ignore all bleeding (but see below) and stun results, and are immune to mind-based attacks. Despite their great strengths, they do bear a weakness: bronze men possess a single vein filled with a silvery liquid required for locomotion. This vein runs from the neck to the ankle, where a bronze pin caps the vein. If this pin is removed, then bleeding will result and slow the monster. The bronze man will bleed five hits per round until its hit score drops below zero, in which case it is rendered motionless. The problem facing heroes who know about the pin is reaching it without being hit!

6.0 Supernatural and Undead Entities

6.1 Empusa (Supernatural Entity)

Rare descendants of the goddess Hecate, empusae are the Achaean-era equivalent of vampires. In their natural form, they appear to be beautiful women from the waist up, donkeys from the waist down, wearing brass slippers over their hooves. However, they can swiftly change shape and appear as dogs, cows, or seductive women. In their maiden forms, they seduce men and drain out their victims' vital energies until they die. This attack has the effect of disrupting the bones and tissues of the victim's body so that it appears as if the target fell from a great height. It functions as a level 13 Disruption spell. Empusae do have a weakness: They can be driven into retreat merely with insulting words. The trouble is, they are seldom discovered to be empusae until too late.

6.2 Erinnye or Fury (Supernatural Entity)

The Erinnyes or Furies are the righters of wrongs, not subject to the gods' whims. They have bodies like birds, hair like serpents, wings like bats, and heads, arms, and torsos like those of mortal women. They carry whips and have invulnerable skin that acts as plate armor and renders them immune to heat- and cold-based attacks! When they decide that a mortal deserves punishment for some great crime (such as killing relatives or guests), they launch themselves from their homes in Tartarus (in the Underworld) to hound their victim, usually until he goes mad or dies. Sometimes their punishments last only until the Furies are convinced the victim has suffered enough. As they are immortal, defeating them only makes them angrier when they recover and return. Essentially, the only way to get rid of their attentions is to accept their punishment and hope they will listen to eloquent pleas for mercy. Sometimes the pleas of other gods will convince them to leave. As part of their hounding, Furies force guilt on their victims (as the level 3 Guilt spell, RR). Also, their constant screams create madness in their victims, who must resist a level 6 spell effect (RR) once per month; if a victim's RR failure is greater than –50, then the victim goes insane. The names of three Erinnyes are known to men: Tisiphone, Megera, and Alecto.

6.3 Ghost (Undead Entity)

In Mythic Greece, ghosts come from the unhappy dead, the dwellers of Tartarus. Some remain in the world above, though most are trapped in Tartarus. Normal weapons cannot harm them, yet they still fear injury. Most have drunk from the Rivers Lethe and Cocytus (magical rivers running through the Underworld), so are mourning and amnesiac creatures until they drink blood. The ghost listed on the chart below is based on a typical king. Naturally, the ghosts of great heroes would have statistics that are more appropriate.

6.4 Sphinx (Supernatural Entity)

These beings appear as large winged lions with the heads and shoulders of gorgeous women (or handsome men). In Mythic Greece, the Sphinx is the bearer of famine and plague. The Sphinx’s mere presence creates a level-4 disease/curse affecting those within 50' of it. The disease spreads rapidly, much like plague, infecting both humans and domesticated animals. Whole kingdoms have been decimated by a sphinx's mere presence. They are extremely cunning and intelligent, with the ability to speak and cast spells. Very arrogant, sphinxes love to test their wits with strangers. One favorite tactic is to lie beside a road posing difficult riddles to those passing by. Those unfortunately unable to answer the riddle successfully, the sphinx devours. However, should anyone best a sphinx in a battle of wits or riddles, the sphinx becomes extremely depressed; it may immediately attack, leave the area, or commit suicide.

7.0 Flying Monsters

7.1 Bird, Stymphalian (Flying Monster)

Stymphalian birds are magical birds the size of cranes with plumage that glitters like bronze metal. These feathers are very hard and heavy; Stymphalian birds drop their feathers in flight on their victims (attacks are resolved as a shortbow). They enjoy human flesh and are savage. They are scared by loud, odd noises; however, they have heard pots banging and shouting before, so those attempts will not work. Originally native to the Stymphalian swamp in central Hellas, they can now be found in the Libyan Desert and other far-off places.

7.2 Gryphon (Flying Monster)

Gryphons (griffins) are fierce creatures possessing the wings, head, and forelimbs of a great eagle and the hindquarters of a large lion. They are said to make their homes in caves high in the mountains; numbers of them can be found in Hellas or Africa. These large, fearsome creatures soar the skies in search of prey. Their eagle-like sight enables them to spot objects far beneath them. Once prey is spotted, they swoop down upon it unexpectedly with their six-inch talons. Their favorite meal is horse or any composite creature including horse, such as centaurs and pegasi, which they despise wholeheartedly. Furthermore, their sense of smell is acute, enabling a gryphon to track its prey if necessary.

7.3 Harpy (Flying Monster)

Harpies appear as ugly, cruel women with the wings and the lower torsos of a giant vulture. They take great pleasure in tormenting humans; gods sometimes send them to torture humans for their sins. Traveling in twos or threes, they torture their victims by closely watching over them from a distance, like vultures. Whenever, their victims are about to eat, they come swooping down to befoul the food, the victim, his house, and even his guests with excrement and vomit. Should this fail to torture their victims, they will slash their victims with weapons or long hooked talons. However, they tend to cowardice when confronted by heroes. Thus, they can eventually be persuaded to leave a victim alone; all that is required is to capture them, threaten to kill them, or just kill them. Harpies usually nest on remote isles.

7.4 Pegasus (Flying Monster)

Pegasus was the name of Bellerophon's famous winged horse, and it became commonly used as the name for the entire species. Unlike horses, pegasi can see at night as if it were day. Therefore, it is not surprising that they often venture forth during the night. During a full moon, they are particularly active, being attracted to certain "holy" wells and pools where they drink and clean their wings much like birds do. Ironically, pegasi are solitary creatures and only live with their mates in lairs high up near mountaintops. Only during full moons do the pegasi gather in large numbers, where they can select a mate for life during breeding season. Pegasi are very shy.

7.5 Siren (Flying Monster)

Sirens appear as seductive, mischievous women, though they have the wings and lower torso of a giant hawk. They love to feed on human flesh. Like birds, they travel in flocks to nest on small rocky islands surrounded by treacherous reefs. From the island, sirens sing to passing ships, luring sailors with their magical songs of desire (treat as a level 9 Luring spell). Unlucky sailors lured by their magical singing sail to their deaths as they crash on the hazardous reefs. Then, the sirens swoop down to feed on the poor sailors' remains. Their songs of desire create immense, insatiable longing and desire for the singer. However, for the songs to work, the sailors must be able to hear the singing. Should a sailor resist their song, sirens become very depressed and may attempt suicide by leaping onto the reefs below.

8.0 Giant Races

8.1 Cyclops (Giant Race)

A noted sage snidely reproves, "So, you think you know what a cyclops looks like? Fuggeddaboutit!" In Mythic Greece, several varieties of the one-eye giants can be found. Some cyclopes have multiple heads or pairs of arms. Some live as primitive herdsmen while others are highly skilled masons or smiths. Some of the latter can often be seen working with gods like Hephaestus to produce magical items of great beauty and worth. The temperaments of the crafting cyclopes are usually peaceful and friendly. In contrast, while the herding cyclopes do prefer to live in tidy, well-kept caves well stocked with cheeses, meats, and jars of honey, they are associated with brutish temperament; some are said to feed on the flesh of humans. Therefore, like those of humans, the temperaments of cyclopes vary considerably.

Typically, cyclopes found living together will have similar characteristics. For example, cyclopes living on the same island will tend to have the same number of hands. (The cyclops listed in the table below is of the common, archetypal variety with one eye, one head, and two arms.) In general, cyclopes live away from civilized areas of the world.

In combat, cyclopes are fierce. When using such weapons as tree trunks (treat as clubs) or spears they do double damage. The highly skilled cyclopes will use more sophisticated weapons than will their primitive brothers (e.g., bows, javelins, slings, and swords). All cyclopes can pick up huge boulders to be thrown up to 200' range, using the longbow chart at double damage. Those cyclopes with more than one pair of arms will be able to attack multiple opponents simultaneously. A suggested rule is that for each additional pair of arms the cyclops obtains one additional attack (at–20 OB).

8.2 Giant (Giant Race)

In Mythic Greece, giants usually appear as humans from the waist up and giant serpents from the waist down. Although some giants of stupendous size and strength can battle gods, heroes will generally encounter their smaller cousins, who are imposing enough. They can be found living on isolated islands or in distant lands away from civilization. They are never found in great numbers. Individually, giants can be peaceful or savage, intelligent or brutish, sophisticated or primitive. Their strength in combat is tremendous. Often they have challenged the gods for control of the world. When using weapons, giants do triple damage. All giants who have such are also able to use their serpent tails to bash foes. They are able to throw boulders up to 300' range (missile attack table, double damage).

Giants are descendants of Gaia, the ancient, original goddess of the earth. (Gaia was mother of the Titans, hence grandmother of the Olympians.) Some giants are closely attuned to Elemental Earth and are able to cast spells from the Earth and Fertility spell-list groups. For example, the giant Antaeus, a local king of Libya, has magical regeneration powers whenever touching the earth. All giants' magical powers, if any, are associated with Earth; the GM must determine individual magical powers. Most giants resent the gods; they feel they have been deprived of their rightful position as lords of the world. Many giants perished in their last revolt against the gods several years ago; therefore, giants do not worship the gods.

9.0 MERP Charts

9.1 Fabled Monsters of Mythic Greece MERP Chart

Name

Lvl

Size

MM

Hits

AT

DB

Shld

Melee OB

Notes

Bear, Cave

12

L

25

190

RL

30

N

105LGr/85LCl

L-crit.

Bird, Stymphalian

10

M

40

50

CH

30

N

70bw/50MCl

Flees at strange sounds.

Boar, Great

8

L

20

190

RL

20

N

85HHo/60/LBa

Unpredictable, ill tempered.

Bull, Brazen

6

L

20

170

CH

10

N

50LHo/60/LBa

50 fire bolt, fire

Bull, Giant

9

L

20

230

No

0

N

90LHo/75LBa

L-crit.

Cerberus

10

L

40

200

CH

30

N

80HBi(x3)

Immortal, immune to poison, tamper with honey cakes.

Chimera

12

L

25

200

RL

30

N

90LCl/90LBi/

90LHo/60fb

L-crit, Firebolt, no ambush, all heat attacks damage.

Cyclops (herder)

12

L

5

200

SL

10

N

90LBa/75LCl

H-crit, 2x damage.

Cyclops (smith)

15

L

10

230

CH

30

Y

120we/90LBa

H-crit, 2x damage.

Dolphin, Great

9

L

35

140

SL

40

N

85LBa

Playful, intelligent.

Empusa

14

M

25

110

RL

20

N

80we/70LCl

Special attack, fly, shape-change, ignores stun results, spells, afraid of insults.

Erinnye

12

M

10

100

PL

30

N

110whip/80LBa

Immortal, invoke guilt and madness.

Ghost

6

 

15

90

No

20

N

60MCl

L-crit, stats for typical king, only magical weapons harm, fear spell.

Giant

15

H

10

250

RL

20

N

130we/100LBa

H-crit, 3x damage.

Gorgon

15

M

10

100

PL

10

N

30SCl

Turns foe into stone, may use weapon.

Gryphon

8

L

40

130

SL

30

N

90LCl/60LBa

Hates horses.

Harpy

6

M

10

75

No

10

N

50we/50MCl

 

Horse, Great

5

L

40

140

No

30

N

60MBa

Abilities vary.

Hydra

20

H

25

170

PL

40

N

110HBa/

70LBi(x3 or more)

H-crit, regeneration, poison.

Lion, Great

10

L

30

200

CH

25

N

100LCl/105LBi

L-crit.

Man, Bronze

12

L

15

200

PL

25

N

110we/70ro

L-crit. Hand strike as mace, no stun or bleeding, all crits sustain –1.

Minotaur

10

L

20

180

No

35

N

110we/ 90HHo

L-crit, ignores stuns, immune to poison, Nightvision, favorite weapon battle-axe.

Pegasus

6

L

40

110

No

35

N

60LBa/55MHo

Fly.

Scorpion, Giant

6

M

20

90

CH

40

N

70LPi*2/80LSt

Poison with crit.

Serpent, Great

20

H

35

275

CH

30

N

100HBi/120HGr

H-crit.

Siren

9

M

5

70

No

20

N

50we/60LCl

Charm spell, fly.

Snake, Giant

8

L

20

100

No

40

N

70MBi/40MCr

 

Sphinx

12

L

20

180

RL

60

N

110LCl/90HBa

Spells, fly.

Vulture, Giant

8

L

20

130

No

20

N

80LCl/70LBi

 

9.2 Human Encounters of Mythic Greece MERP Chart

Name

Lvl

MM

Hits

AT

DB

Shld

Melee OB

Notes

Animist

3

5

45

SL

20

N

54we/32we

Typical Priest, may have spells

Animist

6

10

65

SL

25

N

70we/45we

High Priest, may have spells

Bandit

1

5

21

No

15

Y

30we/15bw

 

Bandit

3

5

49

SL

20

Y

54we/45bw

 

Bandit, leader

5

10

85

RL

30

Y

80we/68we

 

Bandit, leader

8

20

95

RL

40

Y

107we/85we

May be a Hero

Centaur

5

30

80

No

30

N

80we/50we

Can use 50LBa for additional attack

Dryad

4

20

50

No

30

N

54we/20bw

Magic, shift-change

King

5

20

60

CH

30

Y

80we/30we

 

Hero

10

25

100

CH

30

Y

130we/55we

Typical Greater Hero

god, minor

N/A

35

500

No

25

N

150we/160we

Magical equipment, spells

Traveler

2

15

52

No

10

N

44we/32bw

Typical merchants or diplomat

Traveler

4

15

62

No

10

N

64we/53bw

 

Satyr

6

20

60

No

30

N

60we/55bw

Can use 40MBa for additional attack

Warrior

1

10

20

RL

30

Y

30we/20we

 

Water Nymph

4

20

50

No

30

N

54MGr/20bw

Magic, shift-change

10.0 Bibliography

10.1 Books

  • Allston, Aaron. Mythic Greece: The Age of Heroes. Charlottesville, VA: Iron Crown Enterprises, 1992.
  • Charlton, S. Coleman, et al. Middle-Earth Role Playing, Second Edition. Charlottesville, VA: Iron Crown Enterprises, 1994.
  • Graves, Robert. The Greek Myth. New York: Penguin Books, 1960.
  • South, Malcolm, Mythical & Fabulous Creatures. Greenwood Press, New York, 1987.

10.2 Motion Pictures

  • Clash of the Titans (MGM/UA, 1981), directed by Desmond Davis.
  • Jason and the Argonauts (Columbia, 1963), directed by Don Chaffey.

Editor's Note

Please post your comments on this article on the RM2 Discussion Board.

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